Some challenges of hearing devices – not your average pair of glasses

Audiologist Glen Sutherland’s most recent post on this blog talked about how hearing aids can improve the quality of your life. And they can. But for those of us who wear them, they can also pose many challenges.

For the uninitiated, hearing aids are NOT like glasses. Pretty much the only things that can go wrong with glasses are that you lose them or the frames break when you drop them on the floor. Both have happened to me.

Hearing devices are another story. Here are a few of the challenges I have experienced.

I have a T-coil switch on my hearing aid to help me hear on the phone and it generally works quite well, a great relief to someone like me who would not be able to use the phone without it. Sometimes however, there is electricity in the air and I get loud static noises when I press the T-coil button on my hearing aid. It could be a plane overhead or an electronic gremlin. Whatever the cause, it just adds to the challenge of carrying on a phone conversation.

Glasses sometimes have a tendency to slip down your nose. A quick push and you are set again. Hearing aids have a mold that is fitted to your ear. Molds work pretty well for a while but eventually they shrink. When that happens, an air pocket is created between the ear and the mold. That causes whistling! Sometimes when people hug me they press against my aid and that can cause whistling sounds. And hats! If the brim of a hat is pressing down on the top of the aid, I get whistling again. Even standing too close to the wall can cause this most annoying sound.

F/M systems also create interesting challenges. For those of you not familiar with this term, these wonderful pieces of technology augment the sound we can receive from hearing aids and cochlear implants. (Unfortunately, my F/M is not compatible with my implant, but that is a story for another post).

I have something called direct audio input in my F/M. This feature, combined with Closed Captioning allows me to understand pretty much everything on television. However, if I move my head just slightly or for some odd reason raise my arm in a certain way, the sound from the F/M cuts out and I hear nothing. I have no idea why! It reminds me of those old fashioned rabbit ears we used to have for televisions. Occasionally someone had to stand and hold the rabbit ears in a certain way for the reception to work.

Just this past week my F/M stopped working. I thought the problem might be with my hearing aid as when I pushed the F/M button on the aid I heard a buzzing noise and then the sound just faded away. Apparently the ‘connection’ (a little piece attached to the hearing aid), was loose. Pretty soon this loose connection would affect the T-coil button as well. Luckily it was an easy fix. I didn’t need to send my hearing aid away for repairs and try to cope with my old replacement aid that gives me only about 50% of the sound I can get with the powerful equipment I have now.

When I remember the rudimentary hearing aids I had as a child I am very grateful for the leaps in technology that allow someone with a very profound loss like me to hear. But they are still a lot more complicated than glasses.

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6 responses to “Some challenges of hearing devices – not your average pair of glasses

  1. Enjoyed this Rosemary….learned a lot

  2. Hi Rosemary, when I need a hearing aid, you will be my consultant. Thanks for the info.

  3. As usual your blog is so beautifully constructed. I can appreciate that it takes lots of thought and editing. It was very edifying. I didn’t know the various causes of whistling. Thanks very much.

  4. Aha! So that what causes the whistling, an air gap. Didn’t know that. Guess I better get that looked into because the whistling is pretty annoying both to me and people nearby.

    Thanks for the info. See, we teachers never know when some little nugget we drop will impact. So cool. Thanks, Rosemary. Keep it coming. Much appreciated.

  5. Appreciate your openness with us, Rosemary, I am learning so much from your posts and hope to be more sensitive as a result of the knowledge I am gaining from you.

  6. In addition to sometimes getting whistling sounds when people hug me or when I wear a hat, I often get them when wearing earrings depending on how I turn my head. I have to take out my hearing aids when I go for upper body massage or to the chiropractor; otherwise, the whistling sound is extremely annoying.

    Jan

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